The Hindenburg over South Boston, USA, 1936.

The Hindenburg over South Boston, USA, 1936.

First underground railway, London, Great Britain, 1890s.

First underground railway, London, Great Britain, 1890s.

Great Pyramids of Giza, by Felix Bonfils, circa 1900s.

Great Pyramids of Giza, by Felix Bonfils, circa 1900s.

New York in the 1970s by Camilo Jose Vergara

"Fram ("Forward") is a ship that was used in expeditions of the Arctic and Antarctic regions by the Norwegian explorers Fridtjof Nansen, Otto Sverdrup, Oscar Wisting, and Roald Amundsen between 1893 and 1912." - says Wikipedia

The first “McDonald’s” restaurant in San Bernardino, California, USA, circa 1948.
"The McDonald brothers opened their first restaurant adjacent to the Monrovia Airport in 1937. It was a tiny octagonal building informally called The Airdrome. That octagonal building was later moved to the San Bernardino location at 1398 North E Street in San Bernardino, California in 1940. Originally a barbecue drive-in, the brothers discovered that most of their profits came from hamburgers. In 1948, they closed their restaurant for three months, reopening it in December as a walk-up hamburger stand that sold hamburgers, potato chips, and orange juice; the following year, french fries and Coca-Cola were added to the menu. This simplified menu, and food preparation using assembly line principles, allowed them to sell hamburgers for 15 cents, or about half as much as at a sit-down restaurant. The restaurant was very successful, and the brothers started to franchise the concept in 1953." - says Wikipedia

The first “McDonald’s” restaurant in San Bernardino, California, USA, circa 1948.

"The McDonald brothers opened their first restaurant adjacent to the Monrovia Airport in 1937. It was a tiny octagonal building informally called The Airdrome. That octagonal building was later moved to the San Bernardino location at 1398 North E Street in San Bernardino, California in 1940. Originally a barbecue drive-in, the brothers discovered that most of their profits came from hamburgers. In 1948, they closed their restaurant for three months, reopening it in December as a walk-up hamburger stand that sold hamburgers, potato chips, and orange juice; the following year, french fries and Coca-Cola were added to the menu. This simplified menu, and food preparation using assembly line principles, allowed them to sell hamburgers for 15 cents, or about half as much as at a sit-down restaurant. The restaurant was very successful, and the brothers started to franchise the concept in 1953." - says Wikipedia

One of the most famous photos of WWI.
Soldiers of an Australian 4th Division field artillery brigade walk on a duckboard track laid across a muddy, shattered battlefield in Chateau Wood, near Hooge, Belgium, October 29, 1917

One of the most famous photos of WWI.

Soldiers of an Australian 4th Division field artillery brigade walk on a duckboard track laid across a muddy, shattered battlefield in Chateau Wood, near Hooge, Belgium, October 29, 1917

George Lincoln Rockwell and members of the American Nazi Party attend a Nation of Islam summit in 1961, Washington D.C., USA.
"American Nazi Party Commander George Lincoln Rockwell, flanked by two members of the party, listening to Malcolm X’s speech at Black Muslims meeting held at the Uline Arena. This is amazing, very powerful shot. Not just from a historical point of view, but also photographically very strong, you can almost feel the tension. The guy on the left looks like he’s not overly happy to be present, whereas the guys on the middle and right fully believe they’re in the right.
From its inception the ANP (American Nazi Party) had referred to African Americans as “niggers” and had affirmed the premise that they were mentally inferior to whites, but Rockwell became enchanted with the idea of a coalition; Nazis and Black Muslims could be allies, since they both sought the same goal—separation of the races.
On Sunday, June 25, 1961, Rockwell and ten troopers attended a Black Muslim rally at Uline Arena in Washington. They watched in awe as convoys of chartered buses unloaded hundreds of passengers outside the arena and the Muslim vendors made a killing on official souvenirs and literature. The Nazis were frisked at the door of the arena by several well-dressed but stern-looking Fruit of Islam guards—the Gestapo of the Nation of Islam. A special guard greeted Rockwell, said into his walkie-talkie that the “big man was coming now,” and escorted them to seats near the stage in the center, surrounded by eight thousand Black Muslims. They were encircled by black journalists, who wanted to know Rockwell’s thoughts. He told reporters he considered the Muslims “black Nazis.” “I am fully in concert with their program and I have the highest respect for Mr. Elijah Muhammad.” Rockwell pointed out his only disagreement with the Muslims was over territory. ‘‘They want a chunk of America and I prefer that they go to Africa.”
After several introductory speakers, Malcolm X stepped to the microphone to deliver a talk entitled “Separation or Death.” “Muslims are not for integration and not for segregation.” Looking up at the audience as if to beg the question, he asked what they “were for.” The audience shouted “Separation.” Rockwell and the troopers vigorously applauded. Later when the audience was asked for donations, Rockwell contributed $20.”

George Lincoln Rockwell and members of the American Nazi Party attend a Nation of Islam summit in 1961, Washington D.C., USA.

"American Nazi Party Commander George Lincoln Rockwell, flanked by two members of the party, listening to Malcolm X’s speech at Black Muslims meeting held at the Uline Arena. This is amazing, very powerful shot. Not just from a historical point of view, but also photographically very strong, you can almost feel the tension. The guy on the left looks like he’s not overly happy to be present, whereas the guys on the middle and right fully believe they’re in the right.

From its inception the ANP (American Nazi Party) had referred to African Americans as “niggers” and had affirmed the premise that they were mentally inferior to whites, but Rockwell became enchanted with the idea of a coalition; Nazis and Black Muslims could be allies, since they both sought the same goal—separation of the races.

On Sunday, June 25, 1961, Rockwell and ten troopers attended a Black Muslim rally at Uline Arena in Washington. They watched in awe as convoys of chartered buses unloaded hundreds of passengers outside the arena and the Muslim vendors made a killing on official souvenirs and literature. The Nazis were frisked at the door of the arena by several well-dressed but stern-looking Fruit of Islam guards—the Gestapo of the Nation of Islam. A special guard greeted Rockwell, said into his walkie-talkie that the “big man was coming now,” and escorted them to seats near the stage in the center, surrounded by eight thousand Black Muslims. They were encircled by black journalists, who wanted to know Rockwell’s thoughts. He told reporters he considered the Muslims “black Nazis.” “I am fully in concert with their program and I have the highest respect for Mr. Elijah Muhammad.” Rockwell pointed out his only disagreement with the Muslims was over territory. ‘‘They want a chunk of America and I prefer that they go to Africa.”

After several introductory speakers, Malcolm X stepped to the microphone to deliver a talk entitled “Separation or Death.” “Muslims are not for integration and not for segregation.” Looking up at the audience as if to beg the question, he asked what they “were for.” The audience shouted “Separation.” Rockwell and the troopers vigorously applauded. Later when the audience was asked for donations, Rockwell contributed $20.”

New York in the 1970s by Camilo Jose Vergara

New York in the 1970s by Camilo Jose Vergara

Nagasaki harbour, Japan, 1880

Nagasaki harbour, Japan, 1880

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 1888-1889.

Photographs of Constantinople by James Robertson and Felice Beato, circa 1855

Widely acknowledged as one of the most talented photographers of the 19th century, Charles Marville (1813–1879) was commissioned by the city of Paris to document both the picturesque, medieval streets of old Paris and the broad boulevards and grand public structures that Baron Georges-Eugène Haussmann built in their place for Emperor Napoleon III. Charles Marville: Photographer of Paris at The Metropolitan Museum of Art presents a selection of around 100 of his photographs.