Photographs of Constantinople by James Robertson and Felice Beato, circa 1855

Widely acknowledged as one of the most talented photographers of the 19th century, Charles Marville (1813–1879) was commissioned by the city of Paris to document both the picturesque, medieval streets of old Paris and the broad boulevards and grand public structures that Baron Georges-Eugène Haussmann built in their place for Emperor Napoleon III. Charles Marville: Photographer of Paris at The Metropolitan Museum of Art presents a selection of around 100 of his photographs.

Destruction of the column on the Place Vendôme during the Paris Commune, Paris, France, 1871

Destruction of the column on the Place Vendôme during the Paris Commune, Paris, France, 1871

The Kaiser Wilhelm der Grosse was a German transatlantic ocean liner. It entered service in 1897 and was the first liner to have four funnels.

As a large passenger ship, the Kaiser Wilhelm der Grosse was built to carry a maximum of 1,506 passengers: 206 first class; 226 second class; 1,074 third class. At the time of her construction, she had a crew numbering a mere 488. However following her refit of 1913, her crew space was increased to 800. The décor of ship was in the style of Baroque revival, overseen by Johann Poppe, who carried out all of the interior decoration. This was unique as usually a ship would have several interior designers.

The interiors were graced with statues, mirrors, tapestries, gilding and various portraits of the Imperial family. The interiors of her sister ships were also placed in the hands of Poppe. The first class salon was noted for its tapestries and its blue seating. The smoking room, a traditionally male preserve, was made to look like a typical German inn. The dining room, capable of holding all passengers in one sitting, rose several decks and was crowned with a dome. The room also had columns and had its chairs fixed to the deck, a typical feature of ocean liners of the era.

German UB III submarines, washed ashore, 1921.

German UB III submarines, washed ashore, 1921.

Paris in color, 1914. Autochrome photos from Albert Kahn museum.

Moscow, Russia, 1920.

Moscow, Russia, 1920.

Moscow, Russia, 1920.

Moscow, Russia, 1920.

India, autochrome color photos by Jules Gervais-Courtellemont, 1923-1926.

Autochrome color photos by Jules Gervais-Courtellemont, France, 1912-1923.

Authochrome color photos of Constantinople by Jules Gervais-Courtellemont, 1923.

Some color photos of Balkans (Bosnia and Herzegovina, Serbia, Bulgaria and Greece) from Albert Kahn’s collection, 1912-1913.

The Dornier Do X was the largest, heaviest, and most powerful flying boat in the world when it was produced by the Dornier company of Germany in 1929. First conceived by Dr. Claudius Dornier in 1924, planning started in late 1925 and after over 240,000 work hours it was completed in June 1929. During the years between the two World Wars, only the Russian Tupolev ANT-20 Maxim Gorki landplane of a few years later was physically larger, but the Tupolev ANT-20 at 53 metric tons maximum takeoff weight was not as heavy as the Do X’s 56 tonnes.

The largest aircraft of its day, the Dornier DO-X was a flying boat powered by no less than 12 engines arranged in tandem atop its huge wings. Designed by Dr. Claude Dornier, the massive flying boat was equipped to carry passengers in the utmost comfort and luxury. Within its spacious hull were three decks containing sleeping quarters, a bar, writing rooms, bathrooms, a kitchen and a dining room salon nearly 60 feet long. Built in Germany in 1929, the DO-X made history that year by carrying 169 passengers into the air, then a record number, for a one-hour flight.